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THE GOOD SAMARITAN
According to the Bible, he was but a Samaritan. The “Good” in the appellation was our own addition because, out of the three who passed by the victim of happenstance on the road side, he was the only one who showed kindness; goodness.
Jesus’ parables often leave us with the easy task of deducing lessons for ourselves. The story of the “Good” Samaritan is a clear example. After the story is told, we conclude that this man who did something humanly impossible at the time – going out of his way to attend to the wounded stranger – was indeed a good man.
Did he really go out of his way? Recall that the victim was clearly unconnected to his world view, political leaning, religious affiliation or denomination. The victim was a total stranger in every sense of the world; even possibly an enemy. What was more, the Samaritan was on his way to an important function but had to shelve his immediate plans.
Upon hearing the parable, our task was simple: “Which of these three do you think was a neighbour to the man who fell into the hands of robbers?” His apostles answered: “The Samaritan!” Jesus concluded thus: “Do like the Samaritan.”
Who is a neighbour? Here Jesus describes a neighbour as a person who performs an ACT, a compassionate deed, and not merely one who observes – even if sympathetically.
I believe the priest and the Levite cared but had constraints. As humans we just cannot see someone wounded and not feel something! Otherwise that part of the story would have been written something like this: “There were two sociopaths, one a priest and the other a Levite, they saw a gravely wounded man on the road and walked past, leaving him for dead.
The Levite and the priest did not understand that Jesus came to break the barriers that separated people. They still could not see themselves interacting with or caring for people outside their social or religious divide.
We are many times like the priest and the Levite. We do extremely good things to those in our circles and rightly so, but we fail to act when disaster strikes those that are not connected to us. If we read the Scriptures to where Jesus said, ‘Do likewise’, then we can see that we have a problem.
Let’s explore what the Samaritan did. First, we can agree it was a patchy First Aid. Though it was a successful form of early resuscitation, it wasn’t enough to keep the man alive. Life Support – sustenance – was needed, hence, the Samaritan found and engaged the innkeeper.
Sustenance is the basis of this parable. With the hope of a reward, the innkeeper sustained the wounded man. When Jesus asked the disciples to go and do likewise, like who did He mean?
Jesus knew all along that he was the samaritan – the saviour pointing us towards the role of innkeeper. Reminding us that salvation reaches beyond first aid, good words, mere presentation but ACT of caring or nurturing, giving wholeheartedly and survival. The Samaritan initiated the act of kindness, but the role of the innkeeper was necessary to see it through.
Salvation reaches beyond the initiator to those who carry out noble acts. The Samaritan even ran out of cash, but the innkeeper continued to provide sustenance in the fragile hope that he would receive his balance. For us, therefore, in doing likewise, we must ensure that life is not just saved, but sustained.
In keeping with what we are learning from Jesus’ parables, let us ask again: ‘Who is my neighbour?’ or, better still, ‘Am I a neighbour to someone? A true neighbour? Am I anything like the Samaritan, the innkeeper, or any of those who provide for and nurture the broken in society?’
Think of what needs rescuing and sustaining in the society and do it.
Share the love, sustain a life and may God help our understanding.
Ose Okodoa.
Luke 10:25-37.

Read more THE GOOD SAMARITAN
According to the Bible, he was but a Samaritan. The “Good” in the appellation was our own addition because, out of the three who passed by the victim of happenstance on the road side, he was the only one who showed kindness; goodness.
Jesus’ parables often leave us with the easy task of deducing lessons for ourselves. The story of the “Good” Samaritan is a clear example. After the story is told, we conclude that this man who did something humanly impossible at the time – going out of his way to attend to the wounded stranger – was indeed a good man.
Did he really go out of his way? Recall that the victim was clearly unconnected to his world view, political leaning, religious affiliation or denomination. The victim was a total stranger in every sense of the world; even possibly an enemy. What was more, the Samaritan was on his way to an important function but had to shelve his immediate plans.
Upon hearing the parable, our task was simple: “Which of these three do you think was a neighbour to the man who fell into the hands of robbers?” His apostles answered: “The Samaritan!” Jesus concluded thus: “Do like the Samaritan.”
Who is a neighbour? Here Jesus describes a neighbour as a person who performs an ACT, a compassionate deed, and not merely one who observes – even if sympathetically.
I believe the priest and the Levite cared but had constraints. As humans we just cannot see someone wounded and not feel something! Otherwise that part of the story would have been written something like this: “There were two sociopaths, one a priest and the other a Levite, they saw a gravely wounded man on the road and walked past, leaving him for dead.
The Levite and the priest did not understand that Jesus came to break the barriers that separated people. They still could not see themselves interacting with or caring for people outside their social or religious divide.
We are many times like the priest and the Levite. We do extremely good things to those in our circles and rightly so, but we fail to act when disaster strikes those that are not connected to us. If we read the Scriptures to where Jesus said, ‘Do likewise’, then we can see that we have a problem.
Let’s explore what the Samaritan did. First, we can agree it was a patchy First Aid. Though it was a successful form of early resuscitation, it wasn’t enough to keep the man alive. Life Support – sustenance – was needed, hence, the Samaritan found and engaged the innkeeper.
Sustenance is the basis of this parable. With the hope of a reward, the innkeeper sustained the wounded man. When Jesus asked the disciples to go and do likewise, like who did He mean?
Jesus knew all along that he was the samaritan – the saviour pointing us towards the role of innkeeper. Reminding us that salvation reaches beyond first aid, good words, mere presentation but ACT of caring or nurturing, giving wholeheartedly and survival. The Samaritan initiated the act of kindness, but the role of the innkeeper was necessary to see it through.
Salvation reaches beyond the initiator to those who carry out noble acts. The Samaritan even ran out of cash, but the innkeeper continued to provide sustenance in the fragile hope that he would receive his balance. For us, therefore, in doing likewise, we must ensure that life is not just saved, but sustained.
In keeping with what we are learning from Jesus’ parables, let us ask again: ‘Who is my neighbour?’ or, better still, ‘Am I a neighbour to someone? A true neighbour? Am I anything like the Samaritan, the innkeeper, or any of those who provide for and nurture the broken in society?’
Think of what needs rescuing and sustaining in the society and do it.
Share the love, sustain a life and may God help our understanding.
Ose Okodoa.
Luke 10:25-37.

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